Jump to navigation Jump to search “Tricornio” redirects here. For the former building in Portsmouth, see Tricorn Centre. For the ballet by Manuel de Falla, see The Three-Cornered Hat. Los Angeles County Museum of Art, M.

The tricorne or tricorn is a style of hat that was popular during the 18th century, falling out of style by 1800, though actually not called a “tricorne” until the mid 1800s. During the 18th century, hats of this general style were referred to as “cocked hats”. Tricornes had a rather broad brim, pinned up on either side of the head and at the back, producing a triangular shape. The hat was typically worn with one point facing forward, though it was not at all unusual for soldiers, who would often rest a rifle or musket on their left shoulder, to wear the tricorne pointed above their left eyebrow to allow better clearance. Tricornes ranged from the very simple and cheap to the extravagant, occasionally incorporating gold or silver lace trimming and feathers. In addition, military and naval versions usually bore a cockade or other national emblem at the front. The tricorne appeared as a result of the evolution of the broad-brim round hat used by Spanish soldiers in Flanders during the 17th century.